Everyday Homoeopathy - third edition

Language
English
Type
Paperback
Publisher
Narayana Verlag
Author(s) David Gemmell
5 Items In stock
Delivery time 24 hours
€12.95

Practical handbook for using homoeopathy in the context of one's own personal and family health care.

A practical guide for the general public on how to use homeopathy for personal and family health care. It addresses 116 situations likely to be encountered in everyday life, with a particular warning that self-medication is in certain situations inappropriate if not dangerous.

This is the revised and expanded new edition of an already successful book, showing you how to use homoeopathy in the everyday context of your own personal and family health care. It covers 116 problems that a lay person is quite likely to encounter and have to cope with, either as first aid or else in a wide variety of complaints and disorders which may not be urgent but where relief and cure are sought.

Dr Gemmell starts by describing the thinking behind homoeopathic medicine, the emphasis it places on relating treatment to a proper assessment of each patient as an individual person, and its freedom from toxic side effects. There is the necessary information on how to observe symptoms and select a remedy, as well as on potency and dosage.
He presents the material in four sections — accidents and first aid, the problems of women, children's problems and general problems -explaining the nature of each problem and suggesting commonsense measures to be taken whatever else is done. He then discusses the particular symptoms and personal circumstances which may be present, using these to point to the appropriate homoeopathic treatment.
He highlights the cases where self-treatment is out of place and medical advice must be sought without delay. He also highlights the cases where homoeopathy may well provide more effective help than conventional medicine, but where self-treatment is equally inappropriate and a professional homoeopathic evaluation should be obtained.

After three years in hospital posts, Dr David Gemmell worked as a principal in general practice in the UK National Health Service and abroad. He then trained in homoeopathic medicine, becoming Medical Registrar at the Royal London Homoeopathic Hospital and subsequentl) Director of Education at the Faculty of Homoeopathy. He practised privately as a consultant homoeopath until his untimely death in 1995. He had all but finished his work on this new edition, which was completed for publication by his friend and colleague Dr Janet Gray.

More Information
ISBN9783955820626
AuthorDavid Gemmell
TypePaperback
LanguageEnglish
Publication Date1997-04-10
Pages223
PublisherNarayana Verlag
Review

This book review is reprinted with the permission of the International Foundation for Homeopathy

reviewed by Donald Hotton

That there is nothing new under the sun may be true but there are certainly different ways of arranging it. Dr. Gemmell is to be congratulated for laying out, in Everyday Homoeopathy, one of the most user friendly self-help books available to the layman for prescribing for any minor health problem. In the time it takes to grab the book off the shelf you have information about the common remedies, their potencies, how often to take them, and possible cautions,

With the younger generation oriented to computers and television, a book like Gemmell's should be appealing. In it one call "see" die answer to a problem quickly rather than having to undertake a laborious reading task.

Would it be fair to describe this book as the "Cliff Notes" to Constantine Hering's The Homoeopathic Domestic Physician? It appears so and is, perhaps, invaluable because of it. Gemmell wrote his book for the same reason Hering wrote his: Everyday Homoeopathy to keep the doctor away.

I am not praising the content of this book. Its contents are entirely consistent with 190 years of homeopathic science. If one looks up Hering's "Sore Throat" (I 883) and then Gemmell's (I 987), 104 years later, Aconite, Belladonna, Mercury, and Hepar will still be listed, but Gemmell does it in two pages with lots of airy room while Hering takes six pages and the space is so cramped it takes an ant to read it. And, Hering doesn't give potencies.

I also compared this book to several modern "first-aid" books including Homoeopathy, A Different Way of Treating Common Ailments by Michel Aubin and Philippe Picard, Homeopathic Remedies for Health Professionals and Lay people by Dale Buegal, Dennis Chernin, and Blair Lewis, The Family Guide to Homeoopathy by Alain Horvilleur, Homeopathic Medicine, First-Aid and Emergency Care by Lyle Morgan, and Homeopathic Medicine, A Doctor's Guide to Remedies for Commonn Ailments by Trevor Smith. Only Trevor Smith's book can really compare to Gemmell's; it makes curing a simple health problem as easy as looking a word up in the dictionary. For instance, under "Sore Throat," all the above books list Hepar among other remedies but only in Smith's and Gemmell's books is it easy to see, and Gemmell includes the suggested potency and the times to repeat the remedy.

The Introduction contains a nuts-and-bolts explanation of homeopathy and its use in minor ailments that should inspire beginners to take the bold Step of prescribing for themselves, family, and friends. The book is a "you got it, you see it, you fix it" book entirely in concert with Hahnemann's "speedy, gentle cure."

Gemmell makes it easy. When you don't have the time to read Hering, pick up Gemmell. This excellent little book takes a modest step towards unveiling our miraculous science for the beginner. It's a good book to have. I recommend it.

RESONANCE MARCH-APRIL 1992

Review

This book review is reprinted with the permission of the International Foundation for Homeopathy

reviewed by Donald Hotton

That there is nothing new under the sun may be true but there are certainly different ways of arranging it. Dr. Gemmell is to be congratulated for laying out, in Everyday Homoeopathy, one of the most user friendly self-help books available to the layman for prescribing for any minor health problem. In the time it takes to grab the book off the shelf you have information about the common remedies, their potencies, how often to take them, and possible cautions,

With the younger generation oriented to computers and television, a book like Gemmell's should be appealing. In it one call "see" die answer to a problem quickly rather than having to undertake a laborious reading task.

Would it be fair to describe this book as the "Cliff Notes" to Constantine Hering's The Homoeopathic Domestic Physician? It appears so and is, perhaps, invaluable because of it. Gemmell wrote his book for the same reason Hering wrote his: Everyday Homoeopathy to keep the doctor away.

I am not praising the content of this book. Its contents are entirely consistent with 190 years of homeopathic science. If one looks up Hering's "Sore Throat" (I 883) and then Gemmell's (I 987), 104 years later, Aconite, Belladonna, Mercury, and Hepar will still be listed, but Gemmell does it in two pages with lots of airy room while Hering takes six pages and the space is so cramped it takes an ant to read it. And, Hering doesn't give potencies.

I also compared this book to several modern "first-aid" books including Homoeopathy, A Different Way of Treating Common Ailments by Michel Aubin and Philippe Picard, Homeopathic Remedies for Health Professionals and Lay people by Dale Buegal, Dennis Chernin, and Blair Lewis, The Family Guide to Homeoopathy by Alain Horvilleur, Homeopathic Medicine, First-Aid and Emergency Care by Lyle Morgan, and Homeopathic Medicine, A Doctor's Guide to Remedies for Commonn Ailments by Trevor Smith. Only Trevor Smith's book can really compare to Gemmell's; it makes curing a simple health problem as easy as looking a word up in the dictionary. For instance, under "Sore Throat," all the above books list Hepar among other remedies but only in Smith's and Gemmell's books is it easy to see, and Gemmell includes the suggested potency and the times to repeat the remedy.

The Introduction contains a nuts-and-bolts explanation of homeopathy and its use in minor ailments that should inspire beginners to take the bold Step of prescribing for themselves, family, and friends. The book is a "you got it, you see it, you fix it" book entirely in concert with Hahnemann's "speedy, gentle cure."

Gemmell makes it easy. When you don't have the time to read Hering, pick up Gemmell. This excellent little book takes a modest step towards unveiling our miraculous science for the beginner. It's a good book to have. I recommend it.

RESONANCE MARCH-APRIL 1992